Marion Bethel presented with 11th Triennial Award For Women‏
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Eleventh CARICOM Triennial Award for Women 2014
Acceptance Speech
At
The 35th Session of The Heads of Government Meeting
CARICOM
Antigua and Barbuda
Tuesday, July 1, 2014
MARION BETHEL
Nassau, Bahamas
Her Excellency Dame Louise Lake-Tack, Governor General of Antigua and Barbuda
Hon. Gaston Browne, Prime Minister of Antigua and Barbuda and Chairman of the Caribbean Community
Other Heads of State and Government of the Caribbean Community
Heads of Delegationsof Member States and Associate Members of CARICOM
Secretary-General of the Caribbean Community
Other Heads of Regional and International Organisations
Membersof Parliament of Antigua and Barbuda and other CARICOM Member Countries
Members of the Diplomatic Corps
Distinguished ladies and gentlemen
Members of the Media
And last, but not least, my beloved family who is here to share in this wonderful celebration with me: my husband, Alfred Sears, my daughters, Ife and Nia, my siblings, Justice Rubie Nottage, Dr. Pamela Etuk, Dr. Paulette Bethel, Owen Bethel and my niece, Kenia Nottage.
A good afternoon to everyone.
I commence with a heartfelt recognition of the plight of the young high-school girls of Chibok, Borno State, abducted in April of…[Full article HERE]
July 6, 2014

Marion Bethel presented with 11th Triennial Award For Women‏

SUBSCRIBE TO THIS Tumblr HERE

Eleventh CARICOM Triennial Award for Women 2014

Acceptance Speech

At

The 35th Session of The Heads of Government Meeting

CARICOM

Antigua and Barbuda

Tuesday, July 1, 2014

MARION BETHEL

Nassau, Bahamas

Her Excellency Dame Louise Lake-Tack, Governor General of Antigua and Barbuda

Hon. Gaston Browne, Prime Minister of Antigua and Barbuda and Chairman of the Caribbean Community

Other Heads of State and Government of the Caribbean Community

Heads of Delegationsof Member States and Associate Members of CARICOM

Secretary-General of the Caribbean Community

Other Heads of Regional and International Organisations

Membersof Parliament of Antigua and Barbuda and other CARICOM Member Countries

Members of the Diplomatic Corps

Distinguished ladies and gentlemen

Members of the Media

And last, but not least, my beloved family who is here to share in this wonderful celebration with me: my husband, Alfred Sears, my daughters, Ife and Nia, my siblings, Justice Rubie Nottage, Dr. Pamela Etuk, Dr. Paulette Bethel, Owen Bethel and my niece, Kenia Nottage.

A good afternoon to everyone.

I commence with a heartfelt recognition of the plight of the young high-school girls of Chibok, Borno State, abducted in April of…[Full article HERE]

Cuban Car Sales Baffle U.S. Media

Cuban dealers sold 50 cars and four motorcycles nationwide in the first six months of the year under a new law that removed limits on auto purchases for the first time in half a century but came with prices so high few people could afford them.
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Long-frustrated Cubans welcomed the law that took effect in January until they saw sticker prices were marked up 400 percent or more, pricing family sedans like European sports cars.
Cuba has said it would invest 75 percent of the proceeds from new car sales in its woeful public transportation system. But total sales at the country’s 11 national dealerships reached just $1.28 million in the first six months of the year, the official website Cubadebate.com reported on Monday, citing Iset Vazquez, vice president of the state enterprise Corporacion CIMEX.
Before the start of this year Cubans had to request authorization from the government to buy from state retailers, which sell new and second-hand vehicles, usually former rental cars. Most of the sales this year appeared to be of the second-hand variety considering the average sale price of $23,759 per vehicle, including the motorcycles.
A Havana Peugeot dealership was pricing its 2013 model 206 at $91,000 when the new rules came into effect, and it wanted $262,000 for the sportier 508. Such prices drew howls of protest from the few Cubans who could even consider buying a car. Most state workers make around $20 a month.
The high prices have also been a complaint of foreign businesses and potential investors, who need government permission to import a new or used car without the huge markup.
Cuba only gradually is loosening the auto market. In 2011, it started allowing its people to buy and sell used cars from each other. Before then, only cars that were in Cuba before the 1959 revolution could be freely bought and sold, which is why there are so many U.S.-made, vintage 1950s cars on the streets. Giant Chevys and Buicks rumble alongside little Soviet-made Ladas, another popular brand dating from the era before 1991 when Moscow was the communist island’s main benefactor.
July 6, 2014

Cuban Car Sales Baffle U.S. Media

Cuban dealers sold 50 cars and four motorcycles nationwide in the first six months of the year under a new law that removed limits on auto purchases for the first time in half a century but came with prices so high few people could afford them.

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR Tumblr HERE

Long-frustrated Cubans welcomed the law that took effect in January until they saw sticker prices were marked up 400 percent or more, pricing family sedans like European sports cars.

Cuba has said it would invest 75 percent of the proceeds from new car sales in its woeful public transportation system. But total sales at the country’s 11 national dealerships reached just $1.28 million in the first six months of the year, the official website Cubadebate.com reported on Monday, citing Iset Vazquez, vice president of the state enterprise Corporacion CIMEX.

Before the start of this year Cubans had to request authorization from the government to buy from state retailers, which sell new and second-hand vehicles, usually former rental cars. Most of the sales this year appeared to be of the second-hand variety considering the average sale price of $23,759 per vehicle, including the motorcycles.

A Havana Peugeot dealership was pricing its 2013 model 206 at $91,000 when the new rules came into effect, and it wanted $262,000 for the sportier 508. Such prices drew howls of protest from the few Cubans who could even consider buying a car. Most state workers make around $20 a month.

The high prices have also been a complaint of foreign businesses and potential investors, who need government permission to import a new or used car without the huge markup.

Cuba only gradually is loosening the auto market. In 2011, it started allowing its people to buy and sell used cars from each other. Before then, only cars that were in Cuba before the 1959 revolution could be freely bought and sold, which is why there are so many U.S.-made, vintage 1950s cars on the streets. Giant Chevys and Buicks rumble alongside little Soviet-made Ladas, another popular brand dating from the era before 1991 when Moscow was the communist island’s main benefactor.

Check out the video : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5f0KucRr_-g

July 6, 2014

WHY IS THIS NOT BIG NEWS?

Parchment ran 12.94 to stun world champion David Oliver and Olympic runner-up Jason Richardson. Pascal Martinot-Lagarde, who won in Lausanne on Thursday, wound up second in 13.05.

"I was not thinking to run that fast today," Parchment said. "Now, I have the feeling I can run even faster. I made some mistakes. I need to improve my technique and keep winning. Still some races to go and then trying to win Commonwealth Games."

THANKS TO ALL OUR FOLLOWERS:
We never forget we do not post without your love… The video has been removed. Not because it shows Jamaica in a bad light, because that would be censorship and in order to be true we should report share good and bad to make things better. But until we get it certified it was filmed in our country it would be wrong to showcase such scenes. It’s a reminder to us that we must be robust in all we do. Bless
July 5, 2014

THANKS TO ALL OUR FOLLOWERS:

We never forget we do not post without your love… The video has been removed. Not because it shows Jamaica in a bad light, because that would be censorship and in order to be true we should report share good and bad to make things better. But until we get it certified it was filmed in our country it would be wrong to showcase such scenes. It’s a reminder to us that we must be robust in all we do. Bless

I'm Black and I'm Cute [We hope you SUBSCRIBE to this tumblr or simply Tell a Friend] No matter what you think about this guy you cannot deny he is happy, proud and brightens your day. When you love yourself it does not matter what haters think. Dress and be what YOU want to be.... (whenever you feel down just watch this)
June 24, 2014

I’m Black and I’m Cute

[We hope you SUBSCRIBE to this tumblr or simply Tell a Friend]

No matter what you think about this guy you cannot deny he is happy, proud and brightens your day. When you love yourself it does not matter what haters think. Dress and be what YOU want to be…. (whenever you feel down just watch this)

June 22, 2014

ETHIOPIA TO JAMAICA - DUB COLOSSUS

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You can imagine my excitement when their new album dropped. When anyone say’s Ethiopian jazz meets Jamaican dub I’m all ears. So the Addis To Omega saga continues not just with a brilliant new CD, but some live performances too. From the album the standout cuts are Boom Ka Boom (And The Dub Disciples)’, 'Keep on Rocking' and lead single 'Madmen.' This is their fourth album and you can catch them LIVE:

Full band (10 piece)

July 19th @ Tropical Pressure Festival, Cornwall

July 20th @ International Festival, Milton Keynes

 

Dub Colossus Sound System (4 or 5 piece)

Aug 16th @ One Love Festival, Leighton Buzzard

Really worth not just buying this CD, but seeing them live. 

acebook.com/dubcolossus

@dubcolossus

dubcolossus.org

the original david
June 21, 2014

the original david

The fruit that changed the world
(PLEASE FOLLOW BOTH Tumblr’s  HERE & HERE)

Ten thousand years ago, in the forests of south-east Asia, there was a flowering, herbaceous plant, with broad, fibrous leaves, beautiful white flowers and bunches of cylindrical fruits. Today, the fruits of the descendants of this plant are sold in their billions around the world, in markets, supermarkets and corner shops, Shirley Walker reports in this article for London’s Telegraph.
Bananas are now big business, and grown in every tropical region on earth, from India to Africa, and the Caribbean to Australia. They have become so basic to our everyday lives that we sometimes forget they were once living wild in the rainforest, their fruits eaten by tribes of hunter-gatherers.
The wild banana was, however, very small – about the size of your thumb - and packed full of hard seeds that could break your teeth. But one day, about 10,000 years ago, someone chanced upon a plant whose fruits contained no seeds. This prompted the beginning of the selection and breeding that would eventually lead to the birth of the banana we know and love today. Bananas, you see, are very easy to grow – they can be reproduced by cutting off a shoot and sticking it into the ground.
There are now lots of unusual banana varieties around the world, and you can see many of them coming into flower and fruit at the moment, in the Rainforest biome at the Eden Project. Check out the stunning purple fruits of the ‘Red Dakka’, and the amazing, bright yellow bracts of the Paka - a variety from Papua New Guinea that you will find in Oceanic Islands. It produces very big bunches of fruit, used by breeders for crossing with other varieties.
There is a strange variety lurking behind the cassava hut, with funny little green fruits that stick out in all directions, and in the Malaysian home garden, you will find the Pisang Seribu, or ‘1000 fingered banana’, with lots of small yellow fruits forming the longest bunches in the world. This one is the national plant of Malaysia.
The tiny dwarf Cavendish makes a stunning house plant, but if you want to grow a banana plant outside in your garden, try Musa basjoo or its close relative, Ensete ventricosa (Musa ensete). These are both almost hardy, though you may have to give them some protection from frost.
Our massive West African plantains – traditional Horn plantains – are a staple food. They are starchier and less sweet than regular bananas and are eaten cooked or made into beer. In Uganda, everyone grows plantains in their gardens.In our main banana exhibit we are showcasing the Formosa banana and the FHIA hybrids which are bred in Honduras. These are both similar to the Cavendish varieties, but are bred for their disease resistance. Both will be fruiting in the biome in September.
We also have some ornamental varieties dotted around the biome, grown for their showy flowers. Musa ornata, from India and Burma, has erect spikes of orange-yellow flowers with pink bracts, and Musa zebrina, from Indonesia has stripy leaves and lovely flowers with pink brects.
The fibrous leave of the banana plant have long been used to make fine textiles and fishing nets, and in Japan they were used to make high quality kimonos.
It wasn’t too long ago that bananas were considered to be rare and exotic treasures from faraway places, but now they are available in abundance all year round - the world’s most perfect fruit, in its own wrapping.
June 19, 2014

The fruit that changed the world

(PLEASE FOLLOW BOTH Tumblr’s  HERE & HERE)

Ten thousand years ago, in the forests of south-east Asia, there was a flowering, herbaceous plant, with broad, fibrous leaves, beautiful white flowers and bunches of cylindrical fruits. Today, the fruits of the descendants of this plant are sold in their billions around the world, in markets, supermarkets and corner shops, Shirley Walker reports in this article for London’s Telegraph.

Bananas are now big business, and grown in every tropical region on earth, from India to Africa, and the Caribbean to Australia. They have become so basic to our everyday lives that we sometimes forget they were once living wild in the rainforest, their fruits eaten by tribes of hunter-gatherers.

The wild banana was, however, very small – about the size of your thumb - and packed full of hard seeds that could break your teeth. But one day, about 10,000 years ago, someone chanced upon a plant whose fruits contained no seeds. This prompted the beginning of the selection and breeding that would eventually lead to the birth of the banana we know and love today. Bananas, you see, are very easy to grow – they can be reproduced by cutting off a shoot and sticking it into the ground.

There are now lots of unusual banana varieties around the world, and you can see many of them coming into flower and fruit at the moment, in the Rainforest biome at the Eden Project. Check out the stunning purple fruits of the ‘Red Dakka’, and the amazing, bright yellow bracts of the Paka - a variety from Papua New Guinea that you will find in Oceanic Islands. It produces very big bunches of fruit, used by breeders for crossing with other varieties.

There is a strange variety lurking behind the cassava hut, with funny little green fruits that stick out in all directions, and in the Malaysian home garden, you will find the Pisang Seribu, or ‘1000 fingered banana’, with lots of small yellow fruits forming the longest bunches in the world. This one is the national plant of Malaysia.

The tiny dwarf Cavendish makes a stunning house plant, but if you want to grow a banana plant outside in your garden, try Musa basjoo or its close relative, Ensete ventricosa (Musa ensete). These are both almost hardy, though you may have to give them some protection from frost.

Our massive West African plantains – traditional Horn plantains – are a staple food. They are starchier and less sweet than regular bananas and are eaten cooked or made into beer. In Uganda, everyone grows plantains in their gardens.
In our main banana exhibit we are showcasing the Formosa banana and the FHIA hybrids which are bred in Honduras. These are both similar to the Cavendish varieties, but are bred for their disease resistance. Both will be fruiting in the biome in September.

We also have some ornamental varieties dotted around the biome, grown for their showy flowers. Musa ornata, from India and Burma, has erect spikes of orange-yellow flowers with pink bracts, and Musa zebrina, from Indonesia has stripy leaves and lovely flowers with pink brects.

The fibrous leave of the banana plant have long been used to make fine textiles and fishing nets, and in Japan they were used to make high quality kimonos.

It wasn’t too long ago that bananas were considered to be rare and exotic treasures from faraway places, but now they are available in abundance all year round - the world’s most perfect fruit, in its own wrapping.

Hillary Clinton and the U.S. Embargo against Cuba

(PLEASE FOLLOW BOTH Tumblr’s  HERE & HERE)

Everyone has an opinion on recent declarations by U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton that an end to the U.S. Embargo against Cuba must be dissolved (see previous post Clinton says she urged end to Cuba embargo). Some groups such as “Capitol Hill Cubans” say no way; they insist that Clinton is using the Cuba embargo as an excuse (for what? This is never explained.)  Meanwhile, the media is wondering about the public’s support. The Jersey Journal launched a survey with the question: “Do you agree with Hillary Clinton that US Cuban embargo should end?” They are planning to announce the results on Saturday. [I am wondering whether this may also be a good question for the Marist Poll …]
In an appearance in New York hosted by the Council on Foreign Relations, the former secretary of state said, “I think we should advocate for the end of the embargo. We should advocate for normalizing relations and see what they (Cuban officials) do.”
The economic embargo against Cuba has been in place for more than a half-century. As the Wall Street Journal noted, major presidential candidates have tread carefully in discussing the embargo for fear of alienating voters in the voter-rich swing state of Florida. Clinton, a potential presidential candidate, apparently believes that….[Full article here]
June 18, 2014

Hillary Clinton and the U.S. Embargo against Cuba

(PLEASE FOLLOW BOTH Tumblr’s  HERE & HERE)

Everyone has an opinion on recent declarations by U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton that an end to the U.S. Embargo against Cuba must be dissolved (see previous post Clinton says she urged end to Cuba embargo). Some groups such as “Capitol Hill Cubans” say no way; they insist that Clinton is using the Cuba embargo as an excuse (for what? This is never explained.)  Meanwhile, the media is wondering about the public’s support. The Jersey Journal launched a survey with the question: “Do you agree with Hillary Clinton that US Cuban embargo should end?” They are planning to announce the results on Saturday. [I am wondering whether this may also be a good question for the Marist Poll …]

In an appearance in New York hosted by the Council on Foreign Relations, the former secretary of state said, “I think we should advocate for the end of the embargo. We should advocate for normalizing relations and see what they (Cuban officials) do.”

The economic embargo against Cuba has been in place for more than a half-century. As the Wall Street Journal noted, major presidential candidates have tread carefully in discussing the embargo for fear of alienating voters in the voter-rich swing state of Florida. Clinton, a potential presidential candidate, apparently believes that….[Full article here]

US researcher wants Ja to cooperate with Israel on medicinal marijuana - News
June 15, 2014

HAPPY FATHER’S DAY

June 13, 2014

Jamaican tennis star Dustin Brown beats world No 1 Rafael Nadal! (Video Highlights)

WHY IS THIS NOT A BIG THING!!!?

Man gang-raped by armed men in St. Andrew!