I'm Black and I'm Cute [We hope you SUBSCRIBE to this tumblr or simply Tell a Friend] No matter what you think about this guy you cannot deny he is happy, proud and brightens your day. When you love yourself it does not matter what haters think. Dress and be what YOU want to be.... (whenever you feel down just watch this)
June 24, 2014

I’m Black and I’m Cute

[We hope you SUBSCRIBE to this tumblr or simply Tell a Friend]

No matter what you think about this guy you cannot deny he is happy, proud and brightens your day. When you love yourself it does not matter what haters think. Dress and be what YOU want to be…. (whenever you feel down just watch this)

June 22, 2014

ETHIOPIA TO JAMAICA - DUB COLOSSUS

If you love our posts Please subscribe and Spread The Word

You can imagine my excitement when their new album dropped. When anyone say’s Ethiopian jazz meets Jamaican dub I’m all ears. So the Addis To Omega saga continues not just with a brilliant new CD, but some live performances too. From the album the standout cuts are Boom Ka Boom (And The Dub Disciples)’, 'Keep on Rocking' and lead single 'Madmen.' This is their fourth album and you can catch them LIVE:

Full band (10 piece)

July 19th @ Tropical Pressure Festival, Cornwall

July 20th @ International Festival, Milton Keynes

 

Dub Colossus Sound System (4 or 5 piece)

Aug 16th @ One Love Festival, Leighton Buzzard

Really worth not just buying this CD, but seeing them live. 

acebook.com/dubcolossus

@dubcolossus

dubcolossus.org

the original david
June 21, 2014

the original david

The fruit that changed the world
(PLEASE FOLLOW BOTH Tumblr’s  HERE & HERE)

Ten thousand years ago, in the forests of south-east Asia, there was a flowering, herbaceous plant, with broad, fibrous leaves, beautiful white flowers and bunches of cylindrical fruits. Today, the fruits of the descendants of this plant are sold in their billions around the world, in markets, supermarkets and corner shops, Shirley Walker reports in this article for London’s Telegraph.
Bananas are now big business, and grown in every tropical region on earth, from India to Africa, and the Caribbean to Australia. They have become so basic to our everyday lives that we sometimes forget they were once living wild in the rainforest, their fruits eaten by tribes of hunter-gatherers.
The wild banana was, however, very small – about the size of your thumb - and packed full of hard seeds that could break your teeth. But one day, about 10,000 years ago, someone chanced upon a plant whose fruits contained no seeds. This prompted the beginning of the selection and breeding that would eventually lead to the birth of the banana we know and love today. Bananas, you see, are very easy to grow – they can be reproduced by cutting off a shoot and sticking it into the ground.
There are now lots of unusual banana varieties around the world, and you can see many of them coming into flower and fruit at the moment, in the Rainforest biome at the Eden Project. Check out the stunning purple fruits of the ‘Red Dakka’, and the amazing, bright yellow bracts of the Paka - a variety from Papua New Guinea that you will find in Oceanic Islands. It produces very big bunches of fruit, used by breeders for crossing with other varieties.
There is a strange variety lurking behind the cassava hut, with funny little green fruits that stick out in all directions, and in the Malaysian home garden, you will find the Pisang Seribu, or ‘1000 fingered banana’, with lots of small yellow fruits forming the longest bunches in the world. This one is the national plant of Malaysia.
The tiny dwarf Cavendish makes a stunning house plant, but if you want to grow a banana plant outside in your garden, try Musa basjoo or its close relative, Ensete ventricosa (Musa ensete). These are both almost hardy, though you may have to give them some protection from frost.
Our massive West African plantains – traditional Horn plantains – are a staple food. They are starchier and less sweet than regular bananas and are eaten cooked or made into beer. In Uganda, everyone grows plantains in their gardens.In our main banana exhibit we are showcasing the Formosa banana and the FHIA hybrids which are bred in Honduras. These are both similar to the Cavendish varieties, but are bred for their disease resistance. Both will be fruiting in the biome in September.
We also have some ornamental varieties dotted around the biome, grown for their showy flowers. Musa ornata, from India and Burma, has erect spikes of orange-yellow flowers with pink bracts, and Musa zebrina, from Indonesia has stripy leaves and lovely flowers with pink brects.
The fibrous leave of the banana plant have long been used to make fine textiles and fishing nets, and in Japan they were used to make high quality kimonos.
It wasn’t too long ago that bananas were considered to be rare and exotic treasures from faraway places, but now they are available in abundance all year round - the world’s most perfect fruit, in its own wrapping.
June 19, 2014

The fruit that changed the world

(PLEASE FOLLOW BOTH Tumblr’s  HERE & HERE)

Ten thousand years ago, in the forests of south-east Asia, there was a flowering, herbaceous plant, with broad, fibrous leaves, beautiful white flowers and bunches of cylindrical fruits. Today, the fruits of the descendants of this plant are sold in their billions around the world, in markets, supermarkets and corner shops, Shirley Walker reports in this article for London’s Telegraph.

Bananas are now big business, and grown in every tropical region on earth, from India to Africa, and the Caribbean to Australia. They have become so basic to our everyday lives that we sometimes forget they were once living wild in the rainforest, their fruits eaten by tribes of hunter-gatherers.

The wild banana was, however, very small – about the size of your thumb - and packed full of hard seeds that could break your teeth. But one day, about 10,000 years ago, someone chanced upon a plant whose fruits contained no seeds. This prompted the beginning of the selection and breeding that would eventually lead to the birth of the banana we know and love today. Bananas, you see, are very easy to grow – they can be reproduced by cutting off a shoot and sticking it into the ground.

There are now lots of unusual banana varieties around the world, and you can see many of them coming into flower and fruit at the moment, in the Rainforest biome at the Eden Project. Check out the stunning purple fruits of the ‘Red Dakka’, and the amazing, bright yellow bracts of the Paka - a variety from Papua New Guinea that you will find in Oceanic Islands. It produces very big bunches of fruit, used by breeders for crossing with other varieties.

There is a strange variety lurking behind the cassava hut, with funny little green fruits that stick out in all directions, and in the Malaysian home garden, you will find the Pisang Seribu, or ‘1000 fingered banana’, with lots of small yellow fruits forming the longest bunches in the world. This one is the national plant of Malaysia.

The tiny dwarf Cavendish makes a stunning house plant, but if you want to grow a banana plant outside in your garden, try Musa basjoo or its close relative, Ensete ventricosa (Musa ensete). These are both almost hardy, though you may have to give them some protection from frost.

Our massive West African plantains – traditional Horn plantains – are a staple food. They are starchier and less sweet than regular bananas and are eaten cooked or made into beer. In Uganda, everyone grows plantains in their gardens.
In our main banana exhibit we are showcasing the Formosa banana and the FHIA hybrids which are bred in Honduras. These are both similar to the Cavendish varieties, but are bred for their disease resistance. Both will be fruiting in the biome in September.

We also have some ornamental varieties dotted around the biome, grown for their showy flowers. Musa ornata, from India and Burma, has erect spikes of orange-yellow flowers with pink bracts, and Musa zebrina, from Indonesia has stripy leaves and lovely flowers with pink brects.

The fibrous leave of the banana plant have long been used to make fine textiles and fishing nets, and in Japan they were used to make high quality kimonos.

It wasn’t too long ago that bananas were considered to be rare and exotic treasures from faraway places, but now they are available in abundance all year round - the world’s most perfect fruit, in its own wrapping.

Hillary Clinton and the U.S. Embargo against Cuba

(PLEASE FOLLOW BOTH Tumblr’s  HERE & HERE)

Everyone has an opinion on recent declarations by U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton that an end to the U.S. Embargo against Cuba must be dissolved (see previous post Clinton says she urged end to Cuba embargo). Some groups such as “Capitol Hill Cubans” say no way; they insist that Clinton is using the Cuba embargo as an excuse (for what? This is never explained.)  Meanwhile, the media is wondering about the public’s support. The Jersey Journal launched a survey with the question: “Do you agree with Hillary Clinton that US Cuban embargo should end?” They are planning to announce the results on Saturday. [I am wondering whether this may also be a good question for the Marist Poll …]
In an appearance in New York hosted by the Council on Foreign Relations, the former secretary of state said, “I think we should advocate for the end of the embargo. We should advocate for normalizing relations and see what they (Cuban officials) do.”
The economic embargo against Cuba has been in place for more than a half-century. As the Wall Street Journal noted, major presidential candidates have tread carefully in discussing the embargo for fear of alienating voters in the voter-rich swing state of Florida. Clinton, a potential presidential candidate, apparently believes that….[Full article here]
June 18, 2014

Hillary Clinton and the U.S. Embargo against Cuba

(PLEASE FOLLOW BOTH Tumblr’s  HERE & HERE)

Everyone has an opinion on recent declarations by U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton that an end to the U.S. Embargo against Cuba must be dissolved (see previous post Clinton says she urged end to Cuba embargo). Some groups such as “Capitol Hill Cubans” say no way; they insist that Clinton is using the Cuba embargo as an excuse (for what? This is never explained.)  Meanwhile, the media is wondering about the public’s support. The Jersey Journal launched a survey with the question: “Do you agree with Hillary Clinton that US Cuban embargo should end?” They are planning to announce the results on Saturday. [I am wondering whether this may also be a good question for the Marist Poll …]

In an appearance in New York hosted by the Council on Foreign Relations, the former secretary of state said, “I think we should advocate for the end of the embargo. We should advocate for normalizing relations and see what they (Cuban officials) do.”

The economic embargo against Cuba has been in place for more than a half-century. As the Wall Street Journal noted, major presidential candidates have tread carefully in discussing the embargo for fear of alienating voters in the voter-rich swing state of Florida. Clinton, a potential presidential candidate, apparently believes that….[Full article here]

US researcher wants Ja to cooperate with Israel on medicinal marijuana - News
June 15, 2014

HAPPY FATHER’S DAY

June 13, 2014

Jamaican tennis star Dustin Brown beats world No 1 Rafael Nadal! (Video Highlights)

WHY IS THIS NOT A BIG THING!!!?

Man gang-raped by armed men in St. Andrew!
Shame……
June 9, 2014

Shame……

Art Exhibition: “Rasin—A Contemporary Art Exhibit” by Kolectif 509
(PLEASE FOLLOW BOTH Tumblr’s  HERE & HERE)


Kolectif 509 presents its latest exhibition “Rasin: A Contemporary Art Exhibit.” The exhibit runs from June 27 to July 6, 2014, at Villa Kalewes, located at 99 Rue Gregoire, Petionville, Haiti.
This exhibit includes work by Josué Azor (Photography); Olivier Bertoni (Painting); David Charlier (Painting/Mixed-Media); Patsye Delatour (Painting/Mixed-Media); Yves Delva (Painting); Mafalda Nicolas Mondestin (Painting); Johnson Sabin (Painting); and Barbara Prezeau Stephenson (Video Performance/Painting).
Kolectif 509 was first founded by Xavier Dalencour and Valérie Noisette in Haiti. The Franco-Haitian and Haitian-American artists decided to form a collective with like-minded people to showcase the diverse work of contemporary artists living and working in the country. Their name comes from the country code for Haiti (509) when called from abroad.

For more information you may call (509) 3701.3892 or write to kolectif509@gmail.com
June 7, 2014

Art Exhibition: “Rasin—A Contemporary Art Exhibit” by Kolectif 509

(PLEASE FOLLOW BOTH Tumblr’s  HERE & HERE)

Kolectif 509 presents its latest exhibition “Rasin: A Contemporary Art Exhibit.” The exhibit runs from June 27 to July 6, 2014, at Villa Kalewes, located at 99 Rue Gregoire, Petionville, Haiti.

This exhibit includes work by Josué Azor (Photography); Olivier Bertoni (Painting); David Charlier (Painting/Mixed-Media); Patsye Delatour (Painting/Mixed-Media); Yves Delva (Painting); Mafalda Nicolas Mondestin (Painting); Johnson Sabin (Painting); and Barbara Prezeau Stephenson (Video Performance/Painting).

Kolectif 509 was first founded by Xavier Dalencour and Valérie Noisette in Haiti. The Franco-Haitian and Haitian-American artists decided to form a collective with like-minded people to showcase the diverse work of contemporary artists living and working in the country. Their name comes from the country code for Haiti (509) when called from abroad.

For more information you may call (509) 3701.3892 or write to kolectif509@gmail.com

June 4, 2014

WTF - Popcarnnnnnnn

Family of Legendary Reggae icon wants singer to stop claiming he is son of Bob Marley!
(PLEASE FOLLOW BOTH Tumblr’s  HERE & HERE)

A singer who goes by the name Fabian Marley may have to stop stating he is the son of the legendary Reggae singer Bob Marley until he can substantiate his claim.
According to a report by the Observer,  the singer Fabian Marley who goes by the moniker ‘Gong Kid’ gives his birth date as July 27, 1968.
He claims to be the result of a liaison between his mother Raphie Munroe and Bob Marley.
He says all his official documents, including his birth certificate, have the Marley surname.
According to the singer, six months after submitting his DNA results to the Marley family, he still hasn’t received a response.
He told the Jamaica Observer that he took the DNA test after receiving a “cease and desist” order from the family’s attorneys, Michael Hylton & Associates.
The document warned him to refrain from using the Marley name and claiming to be the son of reggae legend Bob Marley, unless he supplied concrete evidence.
June 3, 2014

Family of Legendary Reggae icon wants singer to stop claiming he is son of Bob Marley!

(PLEASE FOLLOW BOTH Tumblr’s  HERE & HERE)

A singer who goes by the name Fabian Marley may have to stop stating he is the son of the legendary Reggae singer Bob Marley until he can substantiate his claim.

According to a report by the Observer,  the singer Fabian Marley who goes by the moniker ‘Gong Kid’ gives his birth date as July 27, 1968.

He claims to be the result of a liaison between his mother Raphie Munroe and Bob Marley.

He says all his official documents, including his birth certificate, have the Marley surname.

According to the singer, six months after submitting his DNA results to the Marley family, he still hasn’t received a response.

He told the Jamaica Observer that he took the DNA test after receiving a “cease and desist” order from the family’s attorneys, Michael Hylton & Associates.

The document warned him to refrain from using the Marley name and claiming to be the son of reggae legend Bob Marley, unless he supplied concrete evidence.