JAMAICA ALERT

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After coming back from Jamaica this story was dominating the news feeds. I even got a health warning card at the airport on arrival…
September 15, 2014

JAMAICA ALERT

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After coming back from Jamaica this story was dominating the news feeds. I even got a health warning card at the airport on arrival…

August 23, 2014

Usain Bolt Breaks 100m Indoor WORLD RECORD

August 19, 2014

Arsenal’s Giroud Is Jamaican 

J A M A I C A 
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Do you love the island?
August 16, 2014

J A M A I C A 

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Do you love the island?

GARNET SILK
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We don’t need an excuse to remember greatness.
August 15, 2014

GARNET SILK

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We don’t need an excuse to remember greatness.

HAPPY INDEPENDENCE DAY JAMAICA
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Thanks to all our followers and all the heart felt messages sent to us today - One Love
August 6, 2014

HAPPY INDEPENDENCE DAY JAMAICA

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Thanks to all our followers and all the heart felt messages sent to us today - One Love

Majah Hype And Macka Diamond Dating, Dumped By Girlfriend
Last month Majah Hype denied dating Macka Diamond after rumors began circulating that the two were an item.
The rumors all started from a leaked photo of Hype and Macka Diamond in a compromised position while shooting a music video.
According to the comedian, the rumors almost destroyed his relationship with his longtime girlfriend.
“My girlfriend really took it hard, she thought it was a violation,” Majah Hype said. “It reach a point where things really shake up. Right now, we just a reach a rebuilding phase, but it still kind of sticky……Full article HERE
August 4, 2014

Majah Hype And Macka Diamond Dating, Dumped By Girlfriend

Last month Majah Hype denied dating Macka Diamond after rumors began circulating that the two were an item.

The rumors all started from a leaked photo of Hype and Macka Diamond in a compromised position while shooting a music video.

According to the comedian, the rumors almost destroyed his relationship with his longtime girlfriend.

“My girlfriend really took it hard, she thought it was a violation,” Majah Hype said. “It reach a point where things really shake up. Right now, we just a reach a rebuilding phase, but it still kind of sticky……Full article HERE

Three people shot by "madman" in Jamaica Corportate Area
Major Bush Fire Raging In Jacks Hill, Residents Worried.
July 28, 2014

Major Bush Fire Raging In Jacks Hill, Residents Worried.

Exodus — Over 7,000 professionals left for North America since Great Recession
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OVER 7,000 managers and professionals left Jamaica for North America since the start of the Great Recession.
On average, the number of professionals opting to leave total over 1,100 each year since 2008 when the when the globla financial crisis started.
"People make calculated individual decisions when they decide to leave," said an established, 35-year-old chartered accountant, who asked to remain anonymous and who plans to emigrate to the US at the end of July.
"I know that more than half of my graduating class from UWI left long before me," said the man who currently works at one of Jamaica’s largest banks, and who admits that he has a number of colleagues who have been looking at that option.
He said that his decision to ‘migrate north’ came after years of contemplation, and was largely driven by a number of assessments that he has made of the financial sector since 2007. “The number of layoffs that has been happening in the sector recently” was definitely noted.
"It is not an easy transition [but] I don’t know anybody who has left and hasn’t met their goals or who is not at least better off," he said. "As long as they carry their Jamaica work ethic, they usually make it."
The chartered accountant also noted that “people who leave usually return home for vacation when the time gets cold and a number of them still has assets and strong ties here.”
For Dennis Chung, who admited that were it not for his experience travelling, or “maybe if I wasn’t working or in a worse position”, he too might have made the trek to North America, his prevailing love for Jamaica has been the most dominant reason for staying.
"I have a love for Jamaica [and] I think Jamaica is the best place in the world to live" said the CEO of the Private Sector Organisation of Jamaica (PSOJ), who is also an accountant by profession. "Where else in the world you can go and the society is so warm? Where else in the world you can go in your back yard and pick some Julie mangoes and ackee?"
Chung argues that there are only a few things wrong with Jamaica and he would rather stay here and help to remedy them.
"I would rather stay in my country and fix my country rather than stay outside and help to criticise it," he said. "Everything is not just about having a lot of money, quality of life is a lot more important than that.
"People take simple things for granted, like the fact that you can walk down the road and see Usain Bolt or pay $1,000 and hear all the vintage artiste sing, when people aborad have to pay up to US$100 to see three of them perform."
In accounting for the experiences of some of his colleagues who left for the North, the PSOJ CEO said, “One or two of them have done well, but for the most part a lot of them are not really living the life that they thought they would be living (in Jamaica).”
Chung said that “people have called me and said that they are trying to come back to Jamaica and get a job because it is so difficult up there”.
He reckons that the transition is far from a ‘bed of roses’ because a lot of people don’t have the support base that they would have back home.
"Had some of them been back in Jamaica where they have a solid base and work smart, not hard, they could have actually made it," he said.
He figures that the level of brain drain is largely resultant of the lack of transformative leadership in Jamaica, the issue of crime and the cumbersome and restrictive effect of the Jamaican bureaucracy.
On the other hand, he is confident that ‘no weh no nicer than yaad’, because, despite the fact that while there is still a lot wrong with our politics, “you have some ministers now who are actually showing that type of transformational leadership”.
"Jamaica is getting more mature as a nation because the people are demanding it," he added and the issue of crime, which has always been a problem is trending down "in the right direction", largely because of a change in the culture of policing left by Owen Ellington.

BY TERRON DEWAR Business reporter dewart@jamaicaobserver.com
July 27, 2014

Exodus — Over 7,000 professionals left for North America since Great Recession

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OVER 7,000 managers and professionals left Jamaica for North America since the start of the Great Recession.

On average, the number of professionals opting to leave total over 1,100 each year since 2008 when the when the globla financial crisis started.

"People make calculated individual decisions when they decide to leave," said an established, 35-year-old chartered accountant, who asked to remain anonymous and who plans to emigrate to the US at the end of July.

"I know that more than half of my graduating class from UWI left long before me," said the man who currently works at one of Jamaica’s largest banks, and who admits that he has a number of colleagues who have been looking at that option.

He said that his decision to ‘migrate north’ came after years of contemplation, and was largely driven by a number of assessments that he has made of the financial sector since 2007. “The number of layoffs that has been happening in the sector recently” was definitely noted.

"It is not an easy transition [but] I don’t know anybody who has left and hasn’t met their goals or who is not at least better off," he said. "As long as they carry their Jamaica work ethic, they usually make it."

The chartered accountant also noted that “people who leave usually return home for vacation when the time gets cold and a number of them still has assets and strong ties here.”

For Dennis Chung, who admited that were it not for his experience travelling, or “maybe if I wasn’t working or in a worse position”, he too might have made the trek to North America, his prevailing love for Jamaica has been the most dominant reason for staying.

"I have a love for Jamaica [and] I think Jamaica is the best place in the world to live" said the CEO of the Private Sector Organisation of Jamaica (PSOJ), who is also an accountant by profession. "Where else in the world you can go and the society is so warm? Where else in the world you can go in your back yard and pick some Julie mangoes and ackee?"

Chung argues that there are only a few things wrong with Jamaica and he would rather stay here and help to remedy them.

"I would rather stay in my country and fix my country rather than stay outside and help to criticise it," he said. "Everything is not just about having a lot of money, quality of life is a lot more important than that.

"People take simple things for granted, like the fact that you can walk down the road and see Usain Bolt or pay $1,000 and hear all the vintage artiste sing, when people aborad have to pay up to US$100 to see three of them perform."

In accounting for the experiences of some of his colleagues who left for the North, the PSOJ CEO said, “One or two of them have done well, but for the most part a lot of them are not really living the life that they thought they would be living (in Jamaica).”

Chung said that “people have called me and said that they are trying to come back to Jamaica and get a job because it is so difficult up there”.

He reckons that the transition is far from a ‘bed of roses’ because a lot of people don’t have the support base that they would have back home.

"Had some of them been back in Jamaica where they have a solid base and work smart, not hard, they could have actually made it," he said.

He figures that the level of brain drain is largely resultant of the lack of transformative leadership in Jamaica, the issue of crime and the cumbersome and restrictive effect of the Jamaican bureaucracy.

On the other hand, he is confident that ‘no weh no nicer than yaad’, because, despite the fact that while there is still a lot wrong with our politics, “you have some ministers now who are actually showing that type of transformational leadership”.

"Jamaica is getting more mature as a nation because the people are demanding it," he added and the issue of crime, which has always been a problem is trending down "in the right direction", largely because of a change in the culture of policing left by Owen Ellington.

BY TERRON DEWAR Business reporter dewart@jamaicaobserver.com

Here Comes Bolt
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Six-time Olympic champion Usain Bolt says he will run in the heats of the 4x100m relay at the Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games after arriving on Saturday. There was speculation the Jamaican might choose to race in just the final as he continues to chase top form after an injury-hit start to the season. Can anyone prevent his relay team from winning gold? 
July 26, 2014

Here Comes Bolt

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Six-time Olympic champion Usain Bolt says he will run in the heats of the 4x100m relay at the Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games after arriving on Saturday. There was speculation the Jamaican might choose to race in just the final as he continues to chase top form after an injury-hit start to the season. Can anyone prevent his relay team from winning gold

Jamaica drought conditions expected to get worse - minister
Jamaican world record holder Usain Bolt will head to Rio de Janeiro following the Commonwealth Games at Glasgow 2014 to run in a special 100m event on Copacabana beach.
July 21, 2014

Jamaican world record holder Usain Bolt will head to Rio de Janeiro following the Commonwealth Games at Glasgow 2014 to run in a special 100m event on Copacabana beach.

The Economist recently published “Crime in the Caribbean: Policing for Profit” (by M.W.), an article on private security groups, whose guards may outnumber the police on several islands (by three to one in Jamaica, for example).
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In May the Guardsman private-security group opened a new command centre in Jamaica’s capital, Kingston. Snipping the ribbon was the prime minister, Portia Simpson Miller. Looking on were her long-serving predecessor, PJ Patterson; the opposition security spokesman; and Jamaica’s then police commissioner.
Private security is a serious business across Latin America. According to a 2013 report by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), there are more private security guards than police officers in the region. The Caribbean is particularly fertile ground. […] Fear of violence and property crime is rife; so is distrust of the police. A UNDP seven-country survey published two years ago found less than a quarter of respondents believed their under-resourced police force could control robberies and burglaries; in Trinidad and Tobago, barely one-tenth thought so.
Numbers are fuzzy, but private security guards probably outnumber police by three to one in Jamaica. In Trinidad and Tobago they make up perhaps 8% of the entire workforce. Big companies have international connections, train their staff and deploy technology: Guardsman alone has 75 armoured trucks and 7,000 staff in four countries. Small outfits employ perhaps a dozen untrained guards. Businesses are the main clients. […]
Regulation is patchy on some islands, non-existent in others: the risk of using rogue firms and staff exists. But contracting tasks to reputable operators could free up resources for intelligence-led policing of serious and organized crime. Daily duty in a single low-level courtroom may tie up a dozen or more police, for example. At the more rarefied level, too, the private sector can help. Trinidad’s national security ministry last month announced a partnership with a British security……[Full article HERE]  
July 20, 2014

The Economist recently published “Crime in the Caribbean: Policing for Profit” (by M.W.), an article on private security groups, whose guards may outnumber the police on several islands (by three to one in Jamaica, for example).

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR POSTS HERE

In May the Guardsman private-security group opened a new command centre in Jamaica’s capital, Kingston. Snipping the ribbon was the prime minister, Portia Simpson Miller. Looking on were her long-serving predecessor, PJ Patterson; the opposition security spokesman; and Jamaica’s then police commissioner.

Private security is a serious business across Latin America. According to a 2013 report by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), there are more private security guards than police officers in the region. The Caribbean is particularly fertile ground. […] Fear of violence and property crime is rife; so is distrust of the police. A UNDP seven-country survey published two years ago found less than a quarter of respondents believed their under-resourced police force could control robberies and burglaries; in Trinidad and Tobago, barely one-tenth thought so.

Numbers are fuzzy, but private security guards probably outnumber police by three to one in Jamaica. In Trinidad and Tobago they make up perhaps 8% of the entire workforce. Big companies have international connections, train their staff and deploy technology: Guardsman alone has 75 armoured trucks and 7,000 staff in four countries. Small outfits employ perhaps a dozen untrained guards. Businesses are the main clients. […]

Regulation is patchy on some islands, non-existent in others: the risk of using rogue firms and staff exists. But contracting tasks to reputable operators could free up resources for intelligence-led policing of serious and organized crime. Daily duty in a single low-level courtroom may tie up a dozen or more police, for example. At the more rarefied level, too, the private sector can help. Trinidad’s national security ministry last month announced a partnership with a British security……[Full article HERE]  

GUSSIE PRESENTING THE RIGHT TRACKS (JULY 22)
2CD COLLECTION TRACK LISTING
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DISC 1
1.  The Right Track - Tommy McCook
2.  Guiding Star - Leroy Sibbles
3.  Scorch Special - Simplicity People
4.  Gussie Special - Simplicity People
5.  Classical Illusion - Augustus Pablo
6.  Oh No I Can’t Believe - Gregory Isaacs
7.  Believe A Dub - Augustus Pablo
8.  Love You To Want Me - Horace Andy
9. Girl Don’t Come - Jacob Miller
10. Lying Lips - Leroy Smart
11. Schenectady’s/Schnectady’s Shock - Simplicity People
12. Logan Street Rock - Simplicity People
13. How Can I (Love Someone) - Delroy Wilson
14. Delilah - Horace Andy
15. Born To Love You - The Heptones
16. Born To Dub You (Part One) - Augustus Pablo
17. Born To Dub You (Part Two) - Augustus Pablo
18. Their Own Way - Dennis Brown
19. Pride And Ambition - Leroy Smart
20. Pride Version - Old Boys Inc./Simplicity People/Society Squad
DISC 2
1. Try Me - Roman Stewart
2. Leggo Beast - I Roy
3. Rhythm Style - Simplicity People & Big Youth
4. Stardum - Augustus Pablo
5. No, No, No - Leroy Sibbles
6. Magnificent Seven - I Roy
7. Oregan/Origan Style - Augustus Pablo
8.  KG’s Halfway Tree - Simplicity People
9.  High Jacking - I Roy
10. Skylarking - Augustus Pablo*
11. Skylarking (Part Two) - Augustus Pablo*
12. The Killer (Version) - Society Squad
13. My Time - Gregory Isaacs
14. Funny Feelings - Dennis Brown
15. Danger In Your Eyes - Mighty Diamonds
16. Danger In Your Dub - Tommy McCook*
17. Black Foundation - Augustus ‘Gussie’ Clarke
18. Proud To Be Black - Mikey Dread*
19. Love The Daughter Dem - Trinity
20. Peace Can Solve it - I Roy
*previously unreleased
GUSSIE PRESENTING THE RIGHT TRACKS (JUL 22)
VINYL TRACK LISTING
 SIDE A
1. Tommy McCook - The Right Track
2. Gregory Isaacs - Oh No I Can’t Believe
3. Horace Andy - Love You To Want Me
4. Leroy Sibbles - Guiding Star
5. Jacob Miller - Girl Don’t Come
SIDE B
1. Simplicity People - Schenectady’s Shock
2. Dennis Brown - Their Own Way
3. Delroy Wilson - How Can I Love Someone
4. Horace Andy - Delilah
5. Augustus Pablo - Born To Dub You
6. Leroy Smart - Lying Lips
GUSSIE PRESENTING THE RIGHT SEVENS (AUGUST 5)
7” VINYL BOX SET TRACK LISTING
Disc 1
A. Leroy Smart - Pride And Ambition
B. Old Boys Inc. - Pride Version
Disc 2
A. Leroy Sibbles - No, No, No
B. The Society Squad - The Killer Version
Disc 3
A. Roman Stewart - Try Me
B. Simplicity People featuring Big Youth
Disc 4
A. Leroy Sibbles - Guiding Star
B. Augustus Pablo - Classical Illusion
Disc 5
A. Gregory Isaacs - Oh No I Can’t Believe
B. Augustus Pablo - Believe A Dub
Disc 6
A. The Mighty Diamonds - Danger In Your Eyes
B. Tommy McCook - Danger In Your Dub
Disc 7
A. Mikey Dread - Proud To Be Black
B. Augustus ‘Gussie’ Clarke - Black Foundation
July 16, 2014
GUSSIE PRESENTING THE RIGHT TRACKS (JULY 22)
2CD COLLECTION TRACK LISTING

DISC 1
1.  The Right Track - Tommy McCook
2.  Guiding Star - Leroy Sibbles
3.  Scorch Special - Simplicity People
4.  Gussie Special - Simplicity People
5.  Classical Illusion - Augustus Pablo
6.  Oh No I Can’t Believe - Gregory Isaacs
7.  Believe A Dub - Augustus Pablo
8.  Love You To Want Me - Horace Andy
9. Girl Don’t Come - Jacob Miller
10. Lying Lips - Leroy Smart
11. Schenectady’s/Schnectady’s Shock - Simplicity People
12. Logan Street Rock - Simplicity People
13. How Can I (Love Someone) - Delroy Wilson
14. Delilah - Horace Andy
15. Born To Love You - The Heptones
16. Born To Dub You (Part One) - Augustus Pablo
17. Born To Dub You (Part Two) - Augustus Pablo
18. Their Own Way - Dennis Brown
19. Pride And Ambition - Leroy Smart
20. Pride Version - Old Boys Inc./Simplicity People/Society Squad

DISC 2
1. Try Me - Roman Stewart
2. Leggo Beast - I Roy
3. Rhythm Style - Simplicity People & Big Youth
4. Stardum - Augustus Pablo
5. No, No, No - Leroy Sibbles
6. Magnificent Seven - I Roy
7. Oregan/Origan Style - Augustus Pablo
8.  KG’s Halfway Tree - Simplicity People
9.  High Jacking - I Roy
10. Skylarking - Augustus Pablo*
11. Skylarking (Part Two) - Augustus Pablo*
12. The Killer (Version) - Society Squad
13. My Time - Gregory Isaacs
14. Funny Feelings - Dennis Brown
15. Danger In Your Eyes - Mighty Diamonds
16. Danger In Your Dub - Tommy McCook*
17. Black Foundation - Augustus ‘Gussie’ Clarke
18. Proud To Be Black - Mikey Dread*
19. Love The Daughter Dem - Trinity
20. Peace Can Solve it - I Roy

*previously unreleased


GUSSIE PRESENTING THE RIGHT TRACKS (JUL 22)
VINYL TRACK LISTING

 SIDE A
1. Tommy McCook - The Right Track
2. Gregory Isaacs - Oh No I Can’t Believe
3. Horace Andy - Love You To Want Me
4. Leroy Sibbles - Guiding Star
5. Jacob Miller - Girl Don’t Come

SIDE B
1. Simplicity People - Schenectady’s Shock
2. Dennis Brown - Their Own Way
3. Delroy Wilson - How Can I Love Someone
4. Horace Andy - Delilah
5. Augustus Pablo - Born To Dub You
6. Leroy Smart - Lying Lips


GUSSIE PRESENTING THE RIGHT SEVENS (AUGUST 5)
7” VINYL BOX SET TRACK LISTING

Disc 1
A. Leroy Smart - Pride And Ambition
B. Old Boys Inc. - Pride Version

Disc 2
A. Leroy Sibbles - No, No, No
B. The Society Squad - The Killer Version

Disc 3
A. Roman Stewart - Try Me
B. Simplicity People featuring Big Youth

Disc 4
A. Leroy Sibbles - Guiding Star
B. Augustus Pablo - Classical Illusion

Disc 5
A. Gregory Isaacs - Oh No I Can’t Believe
B. Augustus Pablo - Believe A Dub

Disc 6
A. The Mighty Diamonds - Danger In Your Eyes
B. Tommy McCook - Danger In Your Dub

Disc 7
A. Mikey Dread - Proud To Be Black
B. Augustus ‘Gussie’ Clarke - Black Foundation