October 17, 2014

When Rodigan Met Bunny

Gabriel García Márquez Wax Statue: Nobel Prize Winner Is Immortalized In A Museum In Cuba

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A life-size wax statue of Nobel Prize winner, Gabriel García Márquez was unveiled on the same day former Cuban President, Fidel Castro celebrated his 88th birthday; The statue is placed in the Wax Museum of Cuba in the eastern town of Bayamo, Natalie Roterman reports in this article for Latin Times.
The Colombian appears dressed in his very own clothes, which were donated by his family through a foundation that carries the writer’s name. Márquez is represented in a meditative position while sitting down to make the figure appear even more representative of his persona.
The museums data recorded almost a million visitors up to this past July and hope the addition of the prolific Colombian writer will bring many more. Gabo, as he was known by fans and loved ones, joins the presence of José Martí, Carlos Manuel de Céspedes, Rita Montaner, Benny Moré, Fabio Di Celmo, an Italian tourist who died in a 1997 Havana hotel bombing, Compay Segundo, and American novelist, Ernest Hemingway, who is a fellow Nobel Prize winner. Although he joins many celebrated personalities, there was some controversy about the sculpture being placed almost next to former Venezuelan President, Hugo Chavez.
It is well known that the Colombian writer had a special place in his heart for Cuba. Not only was he close friends with Fidel Castro, but he resided in the island for several years. García Márquez was also known to act as secret emissary between Castro and former US President Bill Clinton was one of the initiators of the International Festival of New Latin American Cinema, which takes place every year in Havana.
September 5, 2014

Gabriel García Márquez Wax Statue: Nobel Prize Winner Is Immortalized In A Museum In Cuba

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A life-size wax statue of Nobel Prize winner, Gabriel García Márquez was unveiled on the same day former Cuban President, Fidel Castro celebrated his 88th birthday; The statue is placed in the Wax Museum of Cuba in the eastern town of Bayamo, Natalie Roterman reports in this article for Latin Times.

The Colombian appears dressed in his very own clothes, which were donated by his family through a foundation that carries the writer’s name. Márquez is represented in a meditative position while sitting down to make the figure appear even more representative of his persona.

The museums data recorded almost a million visitors up to this past July and hope the addition of the prolific Colombian writer will bring many more. Gabo, as he was known by fans and loved ones, joins the presence of José Martí, Carlos Manuel de Céspedes, Rita Montaner, Benny Moré, Fabio Di Celmo, an Italian tourist who died in a 1997 Havana hotel bombing, Compay Segundo, and American novelist, Ernest Hemingway, who is a fellow Nobel Prize winner. Although he joins many celebrated personalities, there was some controversy about the sculpture being placed almost next to former Venezuelan President, Hugo Chavez.

It is well known that the Colombian writer had a special place in his heart for Cuba. Not only was he close friends with Fidel Castro, but he resided in the island for several years. García Márquez was also known to act as secret emissary between Castro and former US President Bill Clinton was one of the initiators of the International Festival of New Latin American Cinema, which takes place every year in Havana.

A Hundred Years Old, the Panama Canal Is About to Get a Lot Bigger
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Even after a century of constant use and the passage of more than a million ships, the great steel gates of the Miraflores locks, at the Pacific entrance of the Panama Canal, still swing open with the precision of a Swiss watch.
So exquisitely fitted and balanced are they that each of the 672-ton leaves can be moved by a pair of 25-horsepower motors. The same can be said for the massive Gatun locks on the Caribbean side. Engineered in the days of Teddy Roosevelt, their doors cast in good Pittsburgh steel, the locks—like the canal itself—were designed to handle with ease ships the size of the Titanic.
And so they can still—as long as the ships come that small.
Nowadays many don’t. Of the roughly 14,000 ships that ….[Full article HERE]
August 21, 2014

A Hundred Years Old, the Panama Canal Is About to Get a Lot Bigger

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Even after a century of constant use and the passage of more than a million ships, the great steel gates of the Miraflores locks, at the Pacific entrance of the Panama Canal, still swing open with the precision of a Swiss watch.

So exquisitely fitted and balanced are they that each of the 672-ton leaves can be moved by a pair of 25-horsepower motors. The same can be said for the massive Gatun locks on the Caribbean side. Engineered in the days of Teddy Roosevelt, their doors cast in good Pittsburgh steel, the locks—like the canal itself—were designed to handle with ease ships the size of the Titanic.

And so they can still—as long as the ships come that small.

Nowadays many don’t. Of the roughly 14,000 ships that ….[Full article HERE]

GARNET SILK
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We don’t need an excuse to remember greatness.
August 15, 2014

GARNET SILK

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We don’t need an excuse to remember greatness.

August 14, 2014

The Great BOB MARLEY

This is a Video Clip of Bob Marley’s Funeral held in Jamaica on May 21,1981.
This was the Biggest funeral ever in Jamaica. Take a look and share with your family and friends. Send some LOVE our way…

HAPPY INDEPENDENCE DAY JAMAICA
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Thanks to all our followers and all the heart felt messages sent to us today - One Love
August 6, 2014

HAPPY INDEPENDENCE DAY JAMAICA

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Thanks to all our followers and all the heart felt messages sent to us today - One Love

How great thou art: 50 years of Afro-Caribbean funerals – in pictures
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The spirituals sung, the Scotch bonnet berets worn, and the rum drunk at the graveside … Charlie Phillips’s photographs chart the rituals and the changes in African-Caribbean funerals in London since the Windrush generation, to preserve a part of British culture he feels has been overlooked. Here Phillips recalls the stories behind some of his most striking images…See it HERE
July 28, 2014

How great thou art: 50 years of Afro-Caribbean funerals – in pictures

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The spirituals sung, the Scotch bonnet berets worn, and the rum drunk at the graveside … Charlie Phillips’s photographs chart the rituals and the changes in African-Caribbean funerals in London since the Windrush generation, to preserve a part of British culture he feels has been overlooked. Here Phillips recalls the stories behind some of his most striking images…See it HERE

Cemetery excavations reveal complicated Jamaican Jewish past
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This article by Maayan Jaffe appeared in the JNS.org website. Follow the link below for the original report and more photos.
Marina Delfos is on a mission. Working with a group of people who come to Jamaica each year through Caribbean Volunteer Expeditions and a handful of local volunteers, she is helping to take inventory of the area’s Jewish gravestones, trying to make sense of the 360-year-old and oft-forgotten Jamaican Jewish past.
This past March, Delfos struck stone while she was on the Way Back When (Black River Heritage Tour) trip with Allison Morris.
“I knew there had to be a cemetery in [the town of] Black River,”said Delfos, who with Morris, a seventh-generation resident of Black River, began inquiring about where the historic Jewish community would have resided there. She asked one elderly man on a bicycle if he knew where they might have resided, and he took the group into the backyard of a neighboring home a few feet away, where there were three Jewish tombstones.
Delfos had to pull back the brush and shift a heavy bed of leaves to read the tombs’inscriptions. But before leaving the backyard, she had…[Full article HERE]
July 9, 2014

Cemetery excavations reveal complicated Jamaican Jewish past

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This article by Maayan Jaffe appeared in the JNS.org website. Follow the link below for the original report and more photos.

Marina Delfos is on a mission. Working with a group of people who come to Jamaica each year through Caribbean Volunteer Expeditions and a handful of local volunteers, she is helping to take inventory of the area’s Jewish gravestones, trying to make sense of the 360-year-old and oft-forgotten Jamaican Jewish past.

This past March, Delfos struck stone while she was on the Way Back When (Black River Heritage Tour) trip with Allison Morris.

“I knew there had to be a cemetery in [the town of] Black River,”said Delfos, who with Morris, a seventh-generation resident of Black River, began inquiring about where the historic Jewish community would have resided there. She asked one elderly man on a bicycle if he knew where they might have resided, and he took the group into the backyard of a neighboring home a few feet away, where there were three Jewish tombstones.

Delfos had to pull back the brush and shift a heavy bed of leaves to read the tombs’inscriptions. But before leaving the backyard, she had…[Full article HERE]

Marion Bethel presented with 11th Triennial Award For Women‏
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Eleventh CARICOM Triennial Award for Women 2014
Acceptance Speech
At
The 35th Session of The Heads of Government Meeting
CARICOM
Antigua and Barbuda
Tuesday, July 1, 2014
MARION BETHEL
Nassau, Bahamas
Her Excellency Dame Louise Lake-Tack, Governor General of Antigua and Barbuda
Hon. Gaston Browne, Prime Minister of Antigua and Barbuda and Chairman of the Caribbean Community
Other Heads of State and Government of the Caribbean Community
Heads of Delegationsof Member States and Associate Members of CARICOM
Secretary-General of the Caribbean Community
Other Heads of Regional and International Organisations
Membersof Parliament of Antigua and Barbuda and other CARICOM Member Countries
Members of the Diplomatic Corps
Distinguished ladies and gentlemen
Members of the Media
And last, but not least, my beloved family who is here to share in this wonderful celebration with me: my husband, Alfred Sears, my daughters, Ife and Nia, my siblings, Justice Rubie Nottage, Dr. Pamela Etuk, Dr. Paulette Bethel, Owen Bethel and my niece, Kenia Nottage.
A good afternoon to everyone.
I commence with a heartfelt recognition of the plight of the young high-school girls of Chibok, Borno State, abducted in April of…[Full article HERE]
July 6, 2014

Marion Bethel presented with 11th Triennial Award For Women‏

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Eleventh CARICOM Triennial Award for Women 2014

Acceptance Speech

At

The 35th Session of The Heads of Government Meeting

CARICOM

Antigua and Barbuda

Tuesday, July 1, 2014

MARION BETHEL

Nassau, Bahamas

Her Excellency Dame Louise Lake-Tack, Governor General of Antigua and Barbuda

Hon. Gaston Browne, Prime Minister of Antigua and Barbuda and Chairman of the Caribbean Community

Other Heads of State and Government of the Caribbean Community

Heads of Delegationsof Member States and Associate Members of CARICOM

Secretary-General of the Caribbean Community

Other Heads of Regional and International Organisations

Membersof Parliament of Antigua and Barbuda and other CARICOM Member Countries

Members of the Diplomatic Corps

Distinguished ladies and gentlemen

Members of the Media

And last, but not least, my beloved family who is here to share in this wonderful celebration with me: my husband, Alfred Sears, my daughters, Ife and Nia, my siblings, Justice Rubie Nottage, Dr. Pamela Etuk, Dr. Paulette Bethel, Owen Bethel and my niece, Kenia Nottage.

A good afternoon to everyone.

I commence with a heartfelt recognition of the plight of the young high-school girls of Chibok, Borno State, abducted in April of…[Full article HERE]

Hillary Clinton and the U.S. Embargo against Cuba

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Everyone has an opinion on recent declarations by U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton that an end to the U.S. Embargo against Cuba must be dissolved (see previous post Clinton says she urged end to Cuba embargo). Some groups such as “Capitol Hill Cubans” say no way; they insist that Clinton is using the Cuba embargo as an excuse (for what? This is never explained.)  Meanwhile, the media is wondering about the public’s support. The Jersey Journal launched a survey with the question: “Do you agree with Hillary Clinton that US Cuban embargo should end?” They are planning to announce the results on Saturday. [I am wondering whether this may also be a good question for the Marist Poll …]
In an appearance in New York hosted by the Council on Foreign Relations, the former secretary of state said, “I think we should advocate for the end of the embargo. We should advocate for normalizing relations and see what they (Cuban officials) do.”
The economic embargo against Cuba has been in place for more than a half-century. As the Wall Street Journal noted, major presidential candidates have tread carefully in discussing the embargo for fear of alienating voters in the voter-rich swing state of Florida. Clinton, a potential presidential candidate, apparently believes that….[Full article here]
June 18, 2014

Hillary Clinton and the U.S. Embargo against Cuba

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Everyone has an opinion on recent declarations by U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton that an end to the U.S. Embargo against Cuba must be dissolved (see previous post Clinton says she urged end to Cuba embargo). Some groups such as “Capitol Hill Cubans” say no way; they insist that Clinton is using the Cuba embargo as an excuse (for what? This is never explained.)  Meanwhile, the media is wondering about the public’s support. The Jersey Journal launched a survey with the question: “Do you agree with Hillary Clinton that US Cuban embargo should end?” They are planning to announce the results on Saturday. [I am wondering whether this may also be a good question for the Marist Poll …]

In an appearance in New York hosted by the Council on Foreign Relations, the former secretary of state said, “I think we should advocate for the end of the embargo. We should advocate for normalizing relations and see what they (Cuban officials) do.”

The economic embargo against Cuba has been in place for more than a half-century. As the Wall Street Journal noted, major presidential candidates have tread carefully in discussing the embargo for fear of alienating voters in the voter-rich swing state of Florida. Clinton, a potential presidential candidate, apparently believes that….[Full article here]

Ciro de Quadros, 74, Dies; Leader in Ridding Latin America and the Caribbean of Polio
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Dr. Ciro de Quadros, a Brazilian epidemiologist who navigated war zones and reimagined outmoded public health practices to lead an immunization campaign that eradicated polio in Latin America and the Caribbean, died on Wednesday in Washington. He was 74.
The cause was pancreatic cancer, said a spokesman for the Sabin Vaccine Institute in Washington, where Dr. de Quadros had been vice president emeritus since 2003.
Dr. de Quadros was relatively little known outside the loosely affiliated web of national and international health authorities that track and combat communicable diseases. But as a director of one of those groups, the Pan American Health Organization, he was widely credited with carrying out one of the boldest — and seemingly least likely — projects in modern epidemiological history.
Beginning in 1985, he dispatched teams of health workers in 15 countries to the most remote, underdeveloped and war-torn areas of the region to reach Latin America’s most vulnerable people: unimmunized children under 5.
Mustering support was not easy. The World Health Organization’s director general, Dr. Halfdan Mahler, at first opposed……..[Full article HERE]
June 3, 2014

Ciro de Quadros, 74, Dies; Leader in Ridding Latin America and the Caribbean of Polio

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Dr. Ciro de Quadros, a Brazilian epidemiologist who navigated war zones and reimagined outmoded public health practices to lead an immunization campaign that eradicated polio in Latin America and the Caribbean, died on Wednesday in Washington. He was 74.

The cause was pancreatic cancer, said a spokesman for the Sabin Vaccine Institute in Washington, where Dr. de Quadros had been vice president emeritus since 2003.

Dr. de Quadros was relatively little known outside the loosely affiliated web of national and international health authorities that track and combat communicable diseases. But as a director of one of those groups, the Pan American Health Organization, he was widely credited with carrying out one of the boldest — and seemingly least likely — projects in modern epidemiological history.

Beginning in 1985, he dispatched teams of health workers in 15 countries to the most remote, underdeveloped and war-torn areas of the region to reach Latin America’s most vulnerable people: unimmunized children under 5.

Mustering support was not easy. The World Health Organization’s director general, Dr. Halfdan Mahler, at first opposed……..[Full article HERE]

Maya Angelou: America’s Miss Lou
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Diane Abbott dedicated her column in Jamaica’s Observer to a celebration of Maya Angelou and her Caribbean roots.
THE death of American writer, performer and activist Maya Angelou at 86, has rightly prompted an outpouring of appreciation of her life and work. I knew her for over 25 years and the praise was well merited.
Angelou was America’s Miss Lou.
She was not necessarily the best poet and writer of her era. But she published seven autobiographies, three books of essays and several books of poetry. She produced innumerable plays, movies and television shows over a 50-year career. Her work encapsulated important truths about her society. And her statuesque presence and engaging performing skills made her an iconic figure.
In the later years of her career she was taken up by US television superstar Oprah Winfrey. This kept Angelou’s public profile high, well into her 80s. Probably the highlight of her career was being invited to perform a poem at the 1983 inauguration of Bill Clinton.
She was the first poet to make an inaugural recitation since Robert Frost at Jack Kennedy’s inauguration. And she was the first black poet to perform at a presidential inaugural ever.
A not so auspicious time in her career was her determined support for Hillary Clinton in the contest with Barack Obama for the Democratic presidential nomination. It was surprising that someone who made so much of her link to important black civil rights figures like Martin Luther King refused initially to support a black man for the presidency.
But Angelou was a creature of her era. She had come to prominence at a time when no black person could succeed without a powerful patron. And the Clintons had been her patrons for so long that she could not tear herself away.
But President Obama gracefully responded to her death by saying: “Over the course of her remarkable life, Maya was many things — an author, poet, civil rights activist, playwright, actress, director, composer, singer and dancer. But above all, she was a storyteller, and her greatest stories were true. A childhood of suffering and abuse actually drove her to stop speaking, but the voice she found helped generations of Americans find their rainbow amidst the clouds, and inspired the rest of us to be our best selves.”
I first met Angelou in London. She was not as famous then as she later became, but she had a small but enthusiastic group of supporters in London. They would gather around her enthralled when she went into one of her long anecdotes.
Over the years I met her on a number of occasions and was privileged to be hosted at her home in Winston Salem in North Carolina. She was everything the eulogies said she was — hugely charismatic and a performer to her fingertips.
What many people do not know about Maya Angelou is that she has deep Caribbean roots. Her grandfather on her mother’s side came from Trinidad and he apparently had a strong Caribbean accent all his life. In an interview with the Trinidad Express in 2010 Angelou said “I learnt a lot about Trinidad’s culture from my mother, particularly the food and the recipes. I learnt to cook the codfish, the ochroes and the greens. And my best friend, the famous writer Paule Marshall, is also West Indian.”
Remarkably, Maya Angelou was vibrant and engaged to the end. We should all hope to lead such a full and long life.
June 2, 2014

Maya Angelou: America’s Miss Lou

(PLEASE FOLLOW BOTH Tumblr’s  HERE & HERE)

Diane Abbott dedicated her column in Jamaica’s Observer to a celebration of Maya Angelou and her Caribbean roots.

THE death of American writer, performer and activist Maya Angelou at 86, has rightly prompted an outpouring of appreciation of her life and work. I knew her for over 25 years and the praise was well merited.

Angelou was America’s Miss Lou.

She was not necessarily the best poet and writer of her era. But she published seven autobiographies, three books of essays and several books of poetry. She produced innumerable plays, movies and television shows over a 50-year career. Her work encapsulated important truths about her society. And her statuesque presence and engaging performing skills made her an iconic figure.

In the later years of her career she was taken up by US television superstar Oprah Winfrey. This kept Angelou’s public profile high, well into her 80s. Probably the highlight of her career was being invited to perform a poem at the 1983 inauguration of Bill Clinton.

She was the first poet to make an inaugural recitation since Robert Frost at Jack Kennedy’s inauguration. And she was the first black poet to perform at a presidential inaugural ever.

A not so auspicious time in her career was her determined support for Hillary Clinton in the contest with Barack Obama for the Democratic presidential nomination. It was surprising that someone who made so much of her link to important black civil rights figures like Martin Luther King refused initially to support a black man for the presidency.

But Angelou was a creature of her era. She had come to prominence at a time when no black person could succeed without a powerful patron. And the Clintons had been her patrons for so long that she could not tear herself away.

But President Obama gracefully responded to her death by saying: “Over the course of her remarkable life, Maya was many things — an author, poet, civil rights activist, playwright, actress, director, composer, singer and dancer. But above all, she was a storyteller, and her greatest stories were true. A childhood of suffering and abuse actually drove her to stop speaking, but the voice she found helped generations of Americans find their rainbow amidst the clouds, and inspired the rest of us to be our best selves.”

I first met Angelou in London. She was not as famous then as she later became, but she had a small but enthusiastic group of supporters in London. They would gather around her enthralled when she went into one of her long anecdotes.

Over the years I met her on a number of occasions and was privileged to be hosted at her home in Winston Salem in North Carolina. She was everything the eulogies said she was — hugely charismatic and a performer to her fingertips.

What many people do not know about Maya Angelou is that she has deep Caribbean roots. Her grandfather on her mother’s side came from Trinidad and he apparently had a strong Caribbean accent all his life. In an interview with the Trinidad Express in 2010 Angelou said “I learnt a lot about Trinidad’s culture from my mother, particularly the food and the recipes. I learnt to cook the codfish, the ochroes and the greens. And my best friend, the famous writer Paule Marshall, is also West Indian.”

Remarkably, Maya Angelou was vibrant and engaged to the end. We should all hope to lead such a full and long life.

Jamaica Folding Under Pressure of Powerful Gay-Rights Lobby, Former Prime Minister Says
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The sacking of Prof Brendan Bain illustrates the intimidating power of the gay-rights lobby, as well as external sources of funding on which we have to rely. I am saddened at the treatment, not just to Professor Bain, but to the Caribbean community.
In his affidavit, Professor Bain rendered a professional opinion that the practice of MSM (men who have sex with other men) was harmful and that decriminalizing it would not necessarily lead to a reduction in the rate of HIV infections. Other professionals may offer contrary views, and the litigants in this particular case are entitled to present affidavits in support of those views.
Professor Bain cannot be expected to……….[Full article HERE]
June 2, 2014

Jamaica Folding Under Pressure of Powerful Gay-Rights Lobby, Former Prime Minister Says

(PLEASE FOLLOW BOTH Tumblr’s  HERE & HERE)

The sacking of Prof Brendan Bain illustrates the intimidating power of the gay-rights lobby, as well as external sources of funding on which we have to rely. I am saddened at the treatment, not just to Professor Bain, but to the Caribbean community.

In his affidavit, Professor Bain rendered a professional opinion that the practice of MSM (men who have sex with other men) was harmful and that decriminalizing it would not necessarily lead to a reduction in the rate of HIV infections. Other professionals may offer contrary views, and the litigants in this particular case are entitled to present affidavits in support of those views.

Professor Bain cannot be expected to……….[Full article HERE]

A Hundred Years of Marcus Garvey
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This  article by Runoko Rashidi appeared in The Atlanta Black Star.For me and many others, Marcus Garvey qualifies as the greatest Black man of the past hundred years. Of course, there are many, many others. There is Kwame Nkrumah and Haile Selassie I and Patrice Lumumba and Nelson Mandela from Africa. And Dr. B.R. Ambedkar, the great hero of the Dalits of India, ranks high as well. But for me, Garvey is tops.In fact, Marcus Mosiah Garvey personifies the excellence of African people. As a mass leader, propagandist, organizer and activist, Garvey had no peer. He ranks with the greatest of the great. His motto, “Up! You mighty race. You can accomplish what you will” continues to resonate with us. His influence and long-term impact are…..[Full article HERE]
May 27, 2014

A Hundred Years of Marcus Garvey

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This  article by Runoko Rashidi appeared in The Atlanta Black Star.
For me and many others, Marcus Garvey qualifies as the greatest Black man of the past hundred years. Of course, there are many, many others. There is Kwame Nkrumah and Haile Selassie I and Patrice Lumumba and Nelson Mandela from Africa. And Dr. B.R. Ambedkar, the great hero of the Dalits of India, ranks high as well. But for me, Garvey is tops.
In fact, Marcus Mosiah Garvey personifies the excellence of African people. As a mass leader, propagandist, organizer and activist, Garvey had no peer. He ranks with the greatest of the great. His motto, “Up! You mighty race. You can accomplish what you will” continues to resonate with us. His influence and long-term impact are…..[Full article HERE]

Jamaica’s Romelda Aiken creates history to become the first player to score 3500 goals in the ANZ Championship!