Major Bush Fire Raging In Jacks Hill, Residents Worried.
July 28, 2014

Major Bush Fire Raging In Jacks Hill, Residents Worried.

Exodus — Over 7,000 professionals left for North America since Great Recession
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OVER 7,000 managers and professionals left Jamaica for North America since the start of the Great Recession.
On average, the number of professionals opting to leave total over 1,100 each year since 2008 when the when the globla financial crisis started.
"People make calculated individual decisions when they decide to leave," said an established, 35-year-old chartered accountant, who asked to remain anonymous and who plans to emigrate to the US at the end of July.
"I know that more than half of my graduating class from UWI left long before me," said the man who currently works at one of Jamaica’s largest banks, and who admits that he has a number of colleagues who have been looking at that option.
He said that his decision to ‘migrate north’ came after years of contemplation, and was largely driven by a number of assessments that he has made of the financial sector since 2007. “The number of layoffs that has been happening in the sector recently” was definitely noted.
"It is not an easy transition [but] I don’t know anybody who has left and hasn’t met their goals or who is not at least better off," he said. "As long as they carry their Jamaica work ethic, they usually make it."
The chartered accountant also noted that “people who leave usually return home for vacation when the time gets cold and a number of them still has assets and strong ties here.”
For Dennis Chung, who admited that were it not for his experience travelling, or “maybe if I wasn’t working or in a worse position”, he too might have made the trek to North America, his prevailing love for Jamaica has been the most dominant reason for staying.
"I have a love for Jamaica [and] I think Jamaica is the best place in the world to live" said the CEO of the Private Sector Organisation of Jamaica (PSOJ), who is also an accountant by profession. "Where else in the world you can go and the society is so warm? Where else in the world you can go in your back yard and pick some Julie mangoes and ackee?"
Chung argues that there are only a few things wrong with Jamaica and he would rather stay here and help to remedy them.
"I would rather stay in my country and fix my country rather than stay outside and help to criticise it," he said. "Everything is not just about having a lot of money, quality of life is a lot more important than that.
"People take simple things for granted, like the fact that you can walk down the road and see Usain Bolt or pay $1,000 and hear all the vintage artiste sing, when people aborad have to pay up to US$100 to see three of them perform."
In accounting for the experiences of some of his colleagues who left for the North, the PSOJ CEO said, “One or two of them have done well, but for the most part a lot of them are not really living the life that they thought they would be living (in Jamaica).”
Chung said that “people have called me and said that they are trying to come back to Jamaica and get a job because it is so difficult up there”.
He reckons that the transition is far from a ‘bed of roses’ because a lot of people don’t have the support base that they would have back home.
"Had some of them been back in Jamaica where they have a solid base and work smart, not hard, they could have actually made it," he said.
He figures that the level of brain drain is largely resultant of the lack of transformative leadership in Jamaica, the issue of crime and the cumbersome and restrictive effect of the Jamaican bureaucracy.
On the other hand, he is confident that ‘no weh no nicer than yaad’, because, despite the fact that while there is still a lot wrong with our politics, “you have some ministers now who are actually showing that type of transformational leadership”.
"Jamaica is getting more mature as a nation because the people are demanding it," he added and the issue of crime, which has always been a problem is trending down "in the right direction", largely because of a change in the culture of policing left by Owen Ellington.

BY TERRON DEWAR Business reporter dewart@jamaicaobserver.com
July 27, 2014

Exodus — Over 7,000 professionals left for North America since Great Recession

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OVER 7,000 managers and professionals left Jamaica for North America since the start of the Great Recession.

On average, the number of professionals opting to leave total over 1,100 each year since 2008 when the when the globla financial crisis started.

"People make calculated individual decisions when they decide to leave," said an established, 35-year-old chartered accountant, who asked to remain anonymous and who plans to emigrate to the US at the end of July.

"I know that more than half of my graduating class from UWI left long before me," said the man who currently works at one of Jamaica’s largest banks, and who admits that he has a number of colleagues who have been looking at that option.

He said that his decision to ‘migrate north’ came after years of contemplation, and was largely driven by a number of assessments that he has made of the financial sector since 2007. “The number of layoffs that has been happening in the sector recently” was definitely noted.

"It is not an easy transition [but] I don’t know anybody who has left and hasn’t met their goals or who is not at least better off," he said. "As long as they carry their Jamaica work ethic, they usually make it."

The chartered accountant also noted that “people who leave usually return home for vacation when the time gets cold and a number of them still has assets and strong ties here.”

For Dennis Chung, who admited that were it not for his experience travelling, or “maybe if I wasn’t working or in a worse position”, he too might have made the trek to North America, his prevailing love for Jamaica has been the most dominant reason for staying.

"I have a love for Jamaica [and] I think Jamaica is the best place in the world to live" said the CEO of the Private Sector Organisation of Jamaica (PSOJ), who is also an accountant by profession. "Where else in the world you can go and the society is so warm? Where else in the world you can go in your back yard and pick some Julie mangoes and ackee?"

Chung argues that there are only a few things wrong with Jamaica and he would rather stay here and help to remedy them.

"I would rather stay in my country and fix my country rather than stay outside and help to criticise it," he said. "Everything is not just about having a lot of money, quality of life is a lot more important than that.

"People take simple things for granted, like the fact that you can walk down the road and see Usain Bolt or pay $1,000 and hear all the vintage artiste sing, when people aborad have to pay up to US$100 to see three of them perform."

In accounting for the experiences of some of his colleagues who left for the North, the PSOJ CEO said, “One or two of them have done well, but for the most part a lot of them are not really living the life that they thought they would be living (in Jamaica).”

Chung said that “people have called me and said that they are trying to come back to Jamaica and get a job because it is so difficult up there”.

He reckons that the transition is far from a ‘bed of roses’ because a lot of people don’t have the support base that they would have back home.

"Had some of them been back in Jamaica where they have a solid base and work smart, not hard, they could have actually made it," he said.

He figures that the level of brain drain is largely resultant of the lack of transformative leadership in Jamaica, the issue of crime and the cumbersome and restrictive effect of the Jamaican bureaucracy.

On the other hand, he is confident that ‘no weh no nicer than yaad’, because, despite the fact that while there is still a lot wrong with our politics, “you have some ministers now who are actually showing that type of transformational leadership”.

"Jamaica is getting more mature as a nation because the people are demanding it," he added and the issue of crime, which has always been a problem is trending down "in the right direction", largely because of a change in the culture of policing left by Owen Ellington.

BY TERRON DEWAR Business reporter dewart@jamaicaobserver.com

Here Comes Bolt
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Six-time Olympic champion Usain Bolt says he will run in the heats of the 4x100m relay at the Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games after arriving on Saturday. There was speculation the Jamaican might choose to race in just the final as he continues to chase top form after an injury-hit start to the season. Can anyone prevent his relay team from winning gold? 
July 26, 2014

Here Comes Bolt

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Six-time Olympic champion Usain Bolt says he will run in the heats of the 4x100m relay at the Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games after arriving on Saturday. There was speculation the Jamaican might choose to race in just the final as he continues to chase top form after an injury-hit start to the season. Can anyone prevent his relay team from winning gold

Jamaican world record holder Usain Bolt will head to Rio de Janeiro following the Commonwealth Games at Glasgow 2014 to run in a special 100m event on Copacabana beach.
July 21, 2014

Jamaican world record holder Usain Bolt will head to Rio de Janeiro following the Commonwealth Games at Glasgow 2014 to run in a special 100m event on Copacabana beach.

You'll be Shocked to Hear Why Minister Louis Farrakhan Says African-Americans Don't Care About Other Blacks From Around The World - Atlanta Blackstar
The Economist recently published “Crime in the Caribbean: Policing for Profit” (by M.W.), an article on private security groups, whose guards may outnumber the police on several islands (by three to one in Jamaica, for example).
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In May the Guardsman private-security group opened a new command centre in Jamaica’s capital, Kingston. Snipping the ribbon was the prime minister, Portia Simpson Miller. Looking on were her long-serving predecessor, PJ Patterson; the opposition security spokesman; and Jamaica’s then police commissioner.
Private security is a serious business across Latin America. According to a 2013 report by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), there are more private security guards than police officers in the region. The Caribbean is particularly fertile ground. […] Fear of violence and property crime is rife; so is distrust of the police. A UNDP seven-country survey published two years ago found less than a quarter of respondents believed their under-resourced police force could control robberies and burglaries; in Trinidad and Tobago, barely one-tenth thought so.
Numbers are fuzzy, but private security guards probably outnumber police by three to one in Jamaica. In Trinidad and Tobago they make up perhaps 8% of the entire workforce. Big companies have international connections, train their staff and deploy technology: Guardsman alone has 75 armoured trucks and 7,000 staff in four countries. Small outfits employ perhaps a dozen untrained guards. Businesses are the main clients. […]
Regulation is patchy on some islands, non-existent in others: the risk of using rogue firms and staff exists. But contracting tasks to reputable operators could free up resources for intelligence-led policing of serious and organized crime. Daily duty in a single low-level courtroom may tie up a dozen or more police, for example. At the more rarefied level, too, the private sector can help. Trinidad’s national security ministry last month announced a partnership with a British security……[Full article HERE]  
July 20, 2014

The Economist recently published “Crime in the Caribbean: Policing for Profit” (by M.W.), an article on private security groups, whose guards may outnumber the police on several islands (by three to one in Jamaica, for example).

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR POSTS HERE

In May the Guardsman private-security group opened a new command centre in Jamaica’s capital, Kingston. Snipping the ribbon was the prime minister, Portia Simpson Miller. Looking on were her long-serving predecessor, PJ Patterson; the opposition security spokesman; and Jamaica’s then police commissioner.

Private security is a serious business across Latin America. According to a 2013 report by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), there are more private security guards than police officers in the region. The Caribbean is particularly fertile ground. […] Fear of violence and property crime is rife; so is distrust of the police. A UNDP seven-country survey published two years ago found less than a quarter of respondents believed their under-resourced police force could control robberies and burglaries; in Trinidad and Tobago, barely one-tenth thought so.

Numbers are fuzzy, but private security guards probably outnumber police by three to one in Jamaica. In Trinidad and Tobago they make up perhaps 8% of the entire workforce. Big companies have international connections, train their staff and deploy technology: Guardsman alone has 75 armoured trucks and 7,000 staff in four countries. Small outfits employ perhaps a dozen untrained guards. Businesses are the main clients. […]

Regulation is patchy on some islands, non-existent in others: the risk of using rogue firms and staff exists. But contracting tasks to reputable operators could free up resources for intelligence-led policing of serious and organized crime. Daily duty in a single low-level courtroom may tie up a dozen or more police, for example. At the more rarefied level, too, the private sector can help. Trinidad’s national security ministry last month announced a partnership with a British security……[Full article HERE]  

READ A BOOK: ‘Til the Well Runs Dry
First-time novelist Lauren Francis-Sharma delivers an extremely solid debut novel with “‘Til the Well Runs Dry,” a book that tracks the sorrowful milestones in the decades long relationship between two young Trinidadians — Marcia Garcia, a mixed-heritage seamstress, and Farouk Karam, an Indian policeman.The couple’s journey starts promisingly enough in the first chapters of the book and marriage follows quickly, but the arc of their relationship falls apart shortly after they say, “I do.”
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Racism, socio-economic gaps, family secrets and a belief in the dark arts work together to keep the two apart for the long-term despite their shared children and emotional devotion to one another.As the story moves from the middle of World War II to the early 1960s, Marcia’s needs begin to change, and she starts to take bigger risks in her life, including leaving the Caribbean for America in an attempt to earn enough money to…[Full article review HERE]
July 7, 2014

READ A BOOK: ‘Til the Well Runs Dry

First-time novelist Lauren Francis-Sharma delivers an extremely solid debut novel with “‘Til the Well Runs Dry,” a book that tracks the sorrowful milestones in the decades long relationship between two young Trinidadians — Marcia Garcia, a mixed-heritage seamstress, and Farouk Karam, an Indian policeman.
The couple’s journey starts promisingly enough in the first chapters of the book and marriage follows quickly, but the arc of their relationship falls apart shortly after they say, “I do.”

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Racism, socio-economic gaps, family secrets and a belief in the dark arts work together to keep the two apart for the long-term despite their shared children and emotional devotion to one another.
As the story moves from the middle of World War II to the early 1960s, Marcia’s needs begin to change, and she starts to take bigger risks in her life, including leaving the Caribbean for America in an attempt to earn enough money to…[Full article review HERE]

Marion Bethel presented with 11th Triennial Award For Women‏
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Eleventh CARICOM Triennial Award for Women 2014
Acceptance Speech
At
The 35th Session of The Heads of Government Meeting
CARICOM
Antigua and Barbuda
Tuesday, July 1, 2014
MARION BETHEL
Nassau, Bahamas
Her Excellency Dame Louise Lake-Tack, Governor General of Antigua and Barbuda
Hon. Gaston Browne, Prime Minister of Antigua and Barbuda and Chairman of the Caribbean Community
Other Heads of State and Government of the Caribbean Community
Heads of Delegationsof Member States and Associate Members of CARICOM
Secretary-General of the Caribbean Community
Other Heads of Regional and International Organisations
Membersof Parliament of Antigua and Barbuda and other CARICOM Member Countries
Members of the Diplomatic Corps
Distinguished ladies and gentlemen
Members of the Media
And last, but not least, my beloved family who is here to share in this wonderful celebration with me: my husband, Alfred Sears, my daughters, Ife and Nia, my siblings, Justice Rubie Nottage, Dr. Pamela Etuk, Dr. Paulette Bethel, Owen Bethel and my niece, Kenia Nottage.
A good afternoon to everyone.
I commence with a heartfelt recognition of the plight of the young high-school girls of Chibok, Borno State, abducted in April of…[Full article HERE]
July 6, 2014

Marion Bethel presented with 11th Triennial Award For Women‏

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Eleventh CARICOM Triennial Award for Women 2014

Acceptance Speech

At

The 35th Session of The Heads of Government Meeting

CARICOM

Antigua and Barbuda

Tuesday, July 1, 2014

MARION BETHEL

Nassau, Bahamas

Her Excellency Dame Louise Lake-Tack, Governor General of Antigua and Barbuda

Hon. Gaston Browne, Prime Minister of Antigua and Barbuda and Chairman of the Caribbean Community

Other Heads of State and Government of the Caribbean Community

Heads of Delegationsof Member States and Associate Members of CARICOM

Secretary-General of the Caribbean Community

Other Heads of Regional and International Organisations

Membersof Parliament of Antigua and Barbuda and other CARICOM Member Countries

Members of the Diplomatic Corps

Distinguished ladies and gentlemen

Members of the Media

And last, but not least, my beloved family who is here to share in this wonderful celebration with me: my husband, Alfred Sears, my daughters, Ife and Nia, my siblings, Justice Rubie Nottage, Dr. Pamela Etuk, Dr. Paulette Bethel, Owen Bethel and my niece, Kenia Nottage.

A good afternoon to everyone.

I commence with a heartfelt recognition of the plight of the young high-school girls of Chibok, Borno State, abducted in April of…[Full article HERE]

THANKS TO ALL OUR FOLLOWERS:
We never forget we do not post without your love… The video has been removed. Not because it shows Jamaica in a bad light, because that would be censorship and in order to be true we should report share good and bad to make things better. But until we get it certified it was filmed in our country it would be wrong to showcase such scenes. It’s a reminder to us that we must be robust in all we do. Bless
July 5, 2014

THANKS TO ALL OUR FOLLOWERS:

We never forget we do not post without your love… The video has been removed. Not because it shows Jamaica in a bad light, because that would be censorship and in order to be true we should report share good and bad to make things better. But until we get it certified it was filmed in our country it would be wrong to showcase such scenes. It’s a reminder to us that we must be robust in all we do. Bless

I'm Black and I'm Cute [We hope you SUBSCRIBE to this tumblr or simply Tell a Friend] No matter what you think about this guy you cannot deny he is happy, proud and brightens your day. When you love yourself it does not matter what haters think. Dress and be what YOU want to be.... (whenever you feel down just watch this)
June 24, 2014

I’m Black and I’m Cute

[We hope you SUBSCRIBE to this tumblr or simply Tell a Friend]

No matter what you think about this guy you cannot deny he is happy, proud and brightens your day. When you love yourself it does not matter what haters think. Dress and be what YOU want to be…. (whenever you feel down just watch this)

Hillary Clinton and the U.S. Embargo against Cuba

(PLEASE FOLLOW BOTH Tumblr’s  HERE & HERE)

Everyone has an opinion on recent declarations by U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton that an end to the U.S. Embargo against Cuba must be dissolved (see previous post Clinton says she urged end to Cuba embargo). Some groups such as “Capitol Hill Cubans” say no way; they insist that Clinton is using the Cuba embargo as an excuse (for what? This is never explained.)  Meanwhile, the media is wondering about the public’s support. The Jersey Journal launched a survey with the question: “Do you agree with Hillary Clinton that US Cuban embargo should end?” They are planning to announce the results on Saturday. [I am wondering whether this may also be a good question for the Marist Poll …]
In an appearance in New York hosted by the Council on Foreign Relations, the former secretary of state said, “I think we should advocate for the end of the embargo. We should advocate for normalizing relations and see what they (Cuban officials) do.”
The economic embargo against Cuba has been in place for more than a half-century. As the Wall Street Journal noted, major presidential candidates have tread carefully in discussing the embargo for fear of alienating voters in the voter-rich swing state of Florida. Clinton, a potential presidential candidate, apparently believes that….[Full article here]
June 18, 2014

Hillary Clinton and the U.S. Embargo against Cuba

(PLEASE FOLLOW BOTH Tumblr’s  HERE & HERE)

Everyone has an opinion on recent declarations by U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton that an end to the U.S. Embargo against Cuba must be dissolved (see previous post Clinton says she urged end to Cuba embargo). Some groups such as “Capitol Hill Cubans” say no way; they insist that Clinton is using the Cuba embargo as an excuse (for what? This is never explained.)  Meanwhile, the media is wondering about the public’s support. The Jersey Journal launched a survey with the question: “Do you agree with Hillary Clinton that US Cuban embargo should end?” They are planning to announce the results on Saturday. [I am wondering whether this may also be a good question for the Marist Poll …]

In an appearance in New York hosted by the Council on Foreign Relations, the former secretary of state said, “I think we should advocate for the end of the embargo. We should advocate for normalizing relations and see what they (Cuban officials) do.”

The economic embargo against Cuba has been in place for more than a half-century. As the Wall Street Journal noted, major presidential candidates have tread carefully in discussing the embargo for fear of alienating voters in the voter-rich swing state of Florida. Clinton, a potential presidential candidate, apparently believes that….[Full article here]

June 15, 2014

HAPPY FATHER’S DAY

June 13, 2014

Jamaican tennis star Dustin Brown beats world No 1 Rafael Nadal! (Video Highlights)

WHY IS THIS NOT A BIG THING!!!?

Man gang-raped by armed men in St. Andrew!